Collection of Research Articles from our “New Research” Section

Each month on our main webpage, we feature a new research article for you to learn from. Be sure to take advantage of the abundance of information found in this collection of research articles from the last couple of years.

From January 2022

Development and psychometric exploration of a semi-structured clinical interview for Misophonia

No psychometrically validated interviews have been developed for misophonia. This paper is on the initial validation of the Duke Misophonia Interview, a step towards a standard diagnostic measure for clinicians and researchers.

(Summary by Cris Edwards)

Article by Rachel E. Guetta, M. Zachary Rosenthal, Clair Cassiello-Robbins, Deepika Anand

Center for Misophonia and Emotion Regulation, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States

[Personality and Individual Differences Journal], March 2022

From December 2021

Misophonia: How FHSU and You can help those needing peace and quiet

This article from the Fort Hays State University student newspaper, might not seem like a major article on misophonia, but student writer CJ Gibson does an excellent job summing up what misophonia is, what it is like to manage with it, and how tough it can be to find understanding and support. Covering everything from famous authors who might have had misophonia to garnering school and workplace accomodations, this article is a great introduction to the world of a person with misohphonia. (Summary by Cris Edwards)

Article by CJ Gibson

[Tiger Media Network, Fort Hays University], September 2021

From November 2021

Item Response Theory Investigation of Misophonia Auditory Triggers

One of several papers recently on the nature of the sounds that trigger people with misophonia. Eating and oral sounds rank as the highest and most common, but are far from the only kinds of sounds that typically activate a misophonic reaction. (Summary by Cris Edwards)

Article by Silia Vitoratou, Nora Uglik-Marucha, Chloe Hayes, Mercede Erfanian, Oliver Pearson, and Jane Gregory

[Audiology Research], October 2021

From October 2021

Development and Initial Validation of the Duke Misophonia Questionnaire

With a number of potential diagnostic methods and self-report measures on the table for assessing misophonia, this paper examines the recently created Duke Misophonia Questionnaire in relation to existing proposed measures. The paper also covers current understanding of misophonia and research that is under way to better grasp what misophonia is. (Summary by Cris Edwards)

[Frontiers in Psychology], September 2021

From September 2021

Obsessed with Sound: An Investigation into Misophonia and its Relation to Memory

This is the Master’s degree thesis by a student researcher who participated in our 2021 online convention.

By Michael A. Tollefsrud, A Thesis Submitted to The Faculty of the Graduate School at North Carolina Central University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree Master of Arts

[ProQuest Dissertations Publishing], 2020

From August 2021

Context influences how individuals with misophonia respond to sounds

Anyone with misophonia can tell you from experience that the severity of a misophonic reaction depends on many factors such as mood, environment, and so on. This study looks at how context affects the degree and severity of a misophonia trigger.

Study by Miren Edelstein (University of California, San Diego),  Bradley Monk (University of California, San Francisco), Vilayanur Ramachandran (University of California, San Diego), and Romke Rouw (University of Amsterdam) (Summary by Cris Edwards)

[bioRXiv the Preprint Server for Biology], September 2020

From July 2021

What sound sources trigger misophonia? Not just chewing and breathing

This new study delves into the types of sounds which people with misophonia are “triggered” by. While people with moderate-to-severe misophonia are aware of the breadth of sounds that are activating to them, the general public has often mistakenly categorized triggering sounds as being of oral or nasal origin. This study looks into that false assumption with more depth. (Summary by Cris Edwards)

[Journal of Clinical Psychology], June 2021

From June 2021

The Motor Basis for Misophonia

Another pioneering new study by neuroscientist, Sukhbinder Kumar [et.al.], reveals that misophonia triggers, though usually auditory, stimulate motor regions of the brains of people who have misophonia. What this means is unclear at present, but brings a great new bit of information in the case to figure out what misophonia is and how it happens. (Summary by Cris Edwards)

[Journal of Neuroscience], May 2021

From May 2021

A Consensus Definition of Misophonia: Using a Delphi Process to Reach Expert Agreement

Clinicians and researchers have not been working with a unified definition of what exactly misophonia is. This paper, authored by sixteen leading researchers of misophonia, presents a cohesive, consensus definition of the disorder for all people who study, diagnose, and experience misophonia to use as a basis for their understanding.

[MedRXiv, The Preprint Server for Health Sciences]; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, April 2021 (Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information).

From April 2021

Cognitive behavioral therapy for misophonia: A randomized clinical trial

In this research article, the authors inform us that patients with misophonia suffer from anger or disgust confronted with specific sounds and that avoidance of cue‐related situations results in social isolation and significant functional impairment. The authors go on with their description of the first randomized, controlled cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) trial for misophonia, evaluating the short‐ and long‐term efficacy.

Authors: Inge J. Jager, Nienke C.C. Vulink, Isidoor O. Bergfeld, Arnold J.J. M. van Loon, Damian A.J.P. Denys (All authors are with the Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Neuroscience, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

[Official Journal of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America], December 2021

From March 2021

The Effectiveness of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy on Anger in Female Students with Misophonia: A Single-Case Study

According to the authors of this new research article, considering the novelty of misophonia, no studies to date have directly addressed the effectiveness of CBT on anger in individuals with misophonia. However, in support of our findings, some studies have indicated the efficacy of CBT on the symptoms of misophonia.

Authors: Khadijeh Roushani, PhD and Mahnaz Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, PhD, Department of Psychology, School of Education and Psychology, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran

[The Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences], January 2021

From February 2021

How Epigenetics, Polyvagal Theory, Neuroscience and Attachment TheoryAre Changing Mental Health Practices

At the 2020 Misophonia Convention, Dr. Marti Glenn presented the topic “What Polyvagal Theory Can Tell Us About Misophonia.” In this excerpt from her acceptance speech when she received the Thomas Verny Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health, Dr. Glenn shares about different areas of research, including Steven Porges’ Polyvagal Theory, which she says helps us calm the nervous system and experience ourselves and the world in different ways.

Talk given 2017 by Marti Glenn, PhD

From January 2021

What sound sources trigger misophonia? Not just chewing and breathing 

 Previous research has focused primarily on aversions to human mouth and nose sound (e.g., chewing, sniffling), but there exists considerable individual variability in sound reported as bothersome, warranting an objective and data-driven investigation. This article shares the outcomes of 3 experimental methods with participants in the study. The study helps validate the disorder quantitatively, offers supporting evidence for the inclusion of misophonia as a legitimate disorder, and emphasizes the need to expand our definition of misophonic trigger sounds.

By Heather A. Hansen, Andrew B. Leber, Zeynep M. Saygin (The Ohio State University Department of Psychology)

[PsyArXuv Preprints Service],  March 2020

From December 2020

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy For Alleviating The Distress Caused By Tinnitus, Hyperacusis And Misophonia: Current Perspectives

This article reviews the evidence related to the efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for alleviating the distress caused by tinnitus, hyperacusis and misophonia. The authors share that Case studies and some limited RCTs (randomized controlled trials) suggest that CBT can also be effective in alleviating the distress caused by hyperacusis and misophonia.

[Dove Medical Press Limited on Pubmed Central], Oct. 2019

From November 2020

Context influences how individuals with misophonia respond to sounds

In this unpublished preprint, misophonia researchers indicate that in general, anecdotal evidence suggests that misophonia triggers involve a combination of sound stimuli and contextual cues.

Research by Miren Edelstein, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, University of California, San Diego; Bradley Monk, PhD, Dept. of Neuroscience, University of California, San Diego; V.S. Ramachandran, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, University of California, San Diego; Romke Rouw, PhD, Dept. of Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam

[bioRxiv Preprint Server for Biology], September, 2020

bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.

From October 2020

Severity of Misophonia Symptoms Is Associated with Worse Cognitive Control When Exposed to Misophonia Trigger Sounds

Article by Emily C. Daniels, Andrew Rodriguez, and Darya Zabelina (Dept. of Psychological Science, University of Arkansas)

[PLOS ONE Journal], January 2020

From September 2020

What’s the Deal with Misophonia?

New studies shed light on what misophonia really is, and what to do about it.

Recent experiments have given us a new, more neurological perspective on misophonia, providing scientific evidence that different brains really do react to sounds in very different ways. In this new article, clinical psychologist Loren Soeiro offers some fresh insight for ways to deal with misophonia.

Loren Soeiro, Ph.D., ABPP, is a psychologist in private practice in New York City, specializing in helping people find success, fulfillment, and peace in their relationships and their work.

[Psychology Today], February 2020

From August 2020

Is Your Family’s Chewing and Slurping Driving You Insane? Here’s What To Do

In this recent article, there is a great description about people’s experiences dealing with misophonia, plus insight from two well-known misophonia experts.

Article by Ryan Prior, CNN, quoting Zachary Rosenthal, Director, Duke University’s Center for Misophonia and Emotional Regulation and Jennifer Brout, Director of the International Misophonia Research Network

[CNN Health], April 2020

From June 2020

Stuck at Home with Misophonia? Some Tips for Coping!

In this recent article in, you will find helpful tips for dealing with misophonia while sheltered in place during the global pandemic.

Article by Jennifer Brout, Psy.D., who helped found the Sensory Processing and Emotion Regulation Program at Duke University and who is Director of the International Misophonia Research Network

[Psychology Today], April 2020

From May 2020

Misophonia – A Neurologic, Psychologic and Audiologic Complex

In this new article, Dr. Ali Danesh and Dr. Hashir Aszh will hopefully help draw much-needed awareness to the condition of misophonia. Although there is no new information introduced, the article is worthwhile because it rounds up most of the existing information now available into one place. They go over the background and currently accepted definition of misophonia, research involving co-existing conditions, underlying causes & neural correlates, the standard evaluations now available and management protocols and methods that have been developed.

In their conclusion, they admit there is no quick fix or magic pill for misophonia but that the use of sound therapies, behavioral modifications, and CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) seems to be promising. They also encourage further research about the effectiveness of other treatment methods, such as electrical and magnetic stimulations, in the search for misophonia management.

If the article helps to promote interest and the much-needed research about misophonia, it can also help in the goal of finding curative treatments for those suffering with the condition.

[The Hearing Journal], March 2020

From April 2020

Development and Psychometric Properties of MisoQuest—A New Self-Report Questionnaire for Misophonia

Funded by the faculty of psychology at the University of Warsaw and the Polish National Science Center, the development and testing of a new questionnaire to assess misophonia is characterized by good psychometric values and is substantially different from misophonia questionnaires currently in use.

[International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health], March 5, 2020.