Potential Therapies That Help

Please read this page carefully. At this point in time (late summer 2014), there are no ‘cures’ for this condition. There are MANY options to help manage it, however, and each person must find the best choice, mostly through trial and error. We are going to list here, on this page, treatments that have been reported to the MA as potential options. Be very careful to do your own research prior to using these methods, but know that you are not alone as thousands of others are also trying out many different approaches to finding help for misophonia. To date, there are no reports of any peer reviewed scientific research studies that have been published that document any treatment option. There are plenty of anecdotal and quasi-official reports of success, but we must be cautious and evaluate using good sense and recommendations.

There are three main types of therapies in the world, really. Pharmaceutical (drugs), Psychological (Counseling or Mental Health) and Physiological (Mechanical). The MA cannot endorse or promote any particular therapy but in this section, we will provide a listing of types of treatments that are being tried and reported.

PHARMACEUTICALS:

Lyrica has been reported as very helpful
Klonopin has been reported as somewhat helpful

PSYCHOLOGICAL:

CBT
DBT
Behavioral Management
Hypnosis
Meditation
Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction

PHYSIOLOGICAL:

Acoustic Therapies from Audiologists including various sound generating devices
Neurobiofeedback, very positive reports from some
Alpha Stim
Chiropractic Adjustment
EMDR
GAPS diet use

LIFESTYLE CHANGES THAT CAN HELP

Exercise (frequent and vigorous)
Dietary changes (healthy, vitamin rich)
Sleep (regular, keep a rhythmic schedule)
Using sound protection as warranted (head sets, iPods, earplugs, ambient sound makers)
Home re-arrangement to foster quiet in certain parts of the house, safe-spots.
Meet up groups to support one another
Planning happy events that do not include eating or close quiet settings, go bowling, biking, etc.
Family counseling to help with boundaries, understanding, supportive actions
Using your American Disabilities Act Protection rights to accomodation on the job and in school

If you have something to add to this list, please use the CONTACT page and send us your recommendation and we will add it to this list.

24 Replies to “Potential Therapies That Help”

  1. I am so amazed to find there is such an association as yours, around something I rather thought I was managing alone. My trigger noise is very difficult because it is something to prevalent in our modern world – humming sounds, like people warming up their cars nearby or the bathroom fan in the next apartment. I have headphones around the house as well as very effective ear plugs, but the headphones means I have to listen to TV or music all the time, which is not what I want to do. I cannot afford the noise reduction headphones that work without a source.

  2. One more thing – I do feel the reactions you mention, sometimes amounting to rage, or a compulsion to get in my car and drive, to get away from it. Usually others don’t even notice the sounds, or are not bothered by them. We had a construction project 2 blocks away and it has been the source of many difficult days for me.

  3. Hello. I have been struggling with Misophonia for years but did not know there was a term for my symptoms .
    I was prescribed Gabapentin / Nerontin for Fybromyalgia and I was pleasantly surprised to experience much less anxiety from sound triggers while taking the Gabapentin. I realize it is not listed as a pharmaceutical to treat Misophonia but it sure does make a notable difference.

    Thank you for your time and dedication to making this information available online. I am finding much needed support from information on your site.

  4. I neved knew I had this Issue until after I got married in 2005. I am a very quiet person. I tip-toe around the house and my few landlords have often mentioned that they never knew I was in because I do not make noise. But after I got married – I noticed that when my wife is washing dishes – anger wells up in me and especially when she is putting away the spoons and plates ( OMG ) If I had a gun, I would have shot her or the wall because . I have mentioned it to her but I think she takes it for granted , I may need to get an Intermediary so that she understands the gravitas of the situation. Anyways – I wanted to find out if there are any chapters of this in Canada, Montreal to be specific.

  5. I have been a volunteer patient advocate in the past for people who live with persistent pain (The American Pain Foundation and the American Pain Society), and learned a great deal about the medical and psychological/behavioral aspects of that condition. I became a public spokesperson and contributor to various panels. I have backed off of that work due to the opioid crisis and the current landscape concerning pain care. I have mixed feelings about the crisis and who or what is responsible, which also leads me to back off for now. All I can say is watch out for corporate & Pharma funding, even for unbranded materials and events!

    So, I understand the role that volunteer advocates play in public awareness, support and research of life-altering disorders. Accordingly, I’m so happy to find a support organization that addresses the issues that have plagued me since childhood: eating and breathing noises. At 62, I can’t say it’s getting any easier. The avoidance, aggravation, tension, barriers to intimacy and feelings of helplessness is generally discounted by most, but the feelings are real and life altering, just as is physical pain.

    If my prior public advocacy skills can help your organization in any way, I am willing to do what I can. I do not shy away from media or public speaking. I can be fairly eloquent (I hope) and compelling. Reach out to me, and perhaps we can figure something out. I am grateful for what you are doing to bring awareness to a condition that is poorly understood and often ridiculed.

    1. Thank you for your note.
      There is a misophonia providers directory which may help you find medical providers with whom to connect:
      https://misophoniainstitute.org/treatment-providers/
      Some cities have Meetup groups. There is also a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The annual convention is being held in October.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Thank you!

  6. I have struggled for many years. I have changed my job to driving trucks bc I thought it was people in general. I’m glad to know this is an actual thing. I love it when things are quiet and or steady sound related. I believe it make me sensitive to the world. Good when focused but bad when I’m trying to relax.

    1. Thank you for your note.
      There is a misophonia providers directory which may help you find a medical provider with whom to connect:
      https://misophoniainstitute.org/treatment-providers/
      Some cities have Meetup groups. There is also a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Hope some of this is helpful for you.

  7. I’ve done some research on this disorder and I believe that I suffer from it. The sound of someone breathing loudly, lights on while I’m trying to sleep, someone’s phone going off or playing a video, etc all make me very angry or anxious. I really hope and can use these tips to help calm me, thank you.

    1. Thank you for your note.
      There is a misophonia providers directory which may help you find a medical providers with whom to connect:
      https://misophoniainstitute.org/treatment-providers/
      Some cities have Meetup groups. There is also a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Hope some of this is helpful for you.

  8. Thank you so much for the work being done by this association. My daughter suffers from Misophonia and it is affecting every aspect of her life. This needs to be a recognized disorder in the DSM. People with this disability need to have the best help possible so they can function in society.

    1. Thank you for your note.
      There is a misophonia providers directory which may help you find a medical providers with whom to connect:
      https://misophoniainstitute.org/treatment-providers/
      Some cities have Meetup groups. There is also a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Hope some of this is helpful for you.

  9. I noticed being bothered by a few noises around 14 or so then to annoying irritation around 30 and now there’s probably 6 to a point of anger and yelling. It’s also directed more at my mother who now lives with me. I avoid certain things with her so I won’t lash out or sometimes even feel disgusted. Does this sound like your people? I know irrational but can’t stop and getting worse. Can you help me?

    1. Thank you for your note.
      There is a misophonia providers directory which may help you find a medical providers with whom to connect:
      https://misophoniainstitute.org/treatment-providers/
      Some cities have Meetup groups. There is also a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Hope some of this is helpful for you.

  10. Thank you so much for this association to bring awareness for Misophonia. It means so much to me that people are actually reaching out to help those who suffer from Misophonia and the effects of it. I’ve been dealing with it since I was around 9 years old, and still to this day have to manage my life around it. It gets so severe to the point where I have suicidal thoughts and scream at my family with rage. I’m only 16 years old and it feels like Misophonia has already taken so much out of my life. I am looking for ways to help myself cope so that I can enjoy life more and those around me, especially my family can as well. Associations like these are the start to finding what can help people like me. Thank you.

    1. Thanks for reaching out. Just so you know, there is a conference coming up in August for those doing research into misophonia, and a convention in October for misophonia sufferers, families, etc. There are many Facebook support groups and may be local Meetups where you can connect, too. You can find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      Good luck.

    2. Thank you for your note. There is a research convention coming up in August for those doing misophonia research.
      The Misophonia Association is also on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MisophoniaAssociation/
      There are several support groups online as well (coping strategies, etc).
      You might also consider the Convention for people with misophonia (and their loved ones) coming up in Minnesota in October: https://misophonia-association.org/2018convention/
      Best–
      elise

  11. It was so nice to find this site (sent to us from our therapist) and a word for it. Our daughter (13) can’t eat, ride in the car, etc. without going into orbit with normal familial sounds. She seems to target her dad more than the rest of us and not sure why. She has been diagnosed with anxiety and taking Zoloft but not sure this will help with misophonia.

    Thank you so much for this web site and information. The struggle is real.

    1. Thanks for your note. There is a research conference coming up in August for those doing research, and a convention in October for misophonia sufferers, families, etc. There are many Facebook support groups and may be local Meetups where you can connect, too. Good luck.

  12. I just joined this Association, and I am so grateful it exists. I’ll be at the October annual conference, and really looking forward to it. My son is 14, has been struggling with misophonia for about two years, now. His symptoms started at around 9 years old at the dinner table, where he would police the diners about their table manners, specifically chewing food with their mouths open (even just slightly) or talking with food in their mouths. It has gotten so severe that I truly believe it is a big part of the reason that he does not want to leave his room at all. We have devised ways to eat in the same area, with him at the kitchen island counter and us at the table across the room. We turn on the TV loudly and turn on the microwave fan for additional sound blocking. He just shared with me and his Theraplay therapist that he has started to get anxious when he hears from downstairs that I’m preparing to eat something (the fork clanking on the plate). He never, ever, wants to go out to eat and also now doesn’t want to walk three blocks down to his favorite ice cream shop, for fear of seeing people eating and/or seeing someone he knows.

    I look forward to learning more here about how to help him. His life is dramatically limited, in large part to this, I believe. I can’t imagine how utterly exhausting it must be for him to manage his environment so that he is not sent into a panicked rage.

    Thank you.

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